mraid

The Year in Ad Ops 2011 – MRAID Specs Released

Even though it’s been the ‘year of mobile’ for the last decade, mobile advertising really did seem to reach a critical mass this year, as many publishers sold some of their first campaigns, and marketers moved more share of budgets to the mobile medium.  From an Ops point of view, this was also the first year for a lot of organizations to come to terms with needing a real process around mobile campaign implementation on both the mobile web as well as in application environments. As it turns out, getting ads, particular rich media ads to work in an app is fairly complex, requiring a higher level of technical expertise than desktop advertising.

Thank goodness then for the IAB’s release of the first set of development specs for mobile rich media APIs, known as MRAID and written in partnership with ORMMA to unify the industry’s approach to in-application advertising and simplify the implementation of mobile rich media.

Why is MRAID Necessary?

Thanks to some of the security features built it to smartphones, a layer of software called a software development kit, or SDK is typically required in the app to allow ads to expand over content, play sound and video, and do other things that are fairly standard in a desktop environment.  An SDK is nothing more than a block of code that a vendor like a rich media company might write to get their products to work in other applications, so the application developers don’t have to write the code themselves.  The problem is that every ad server and network has their own proprietary SDK for publishers to implement in order to get their ads to work, which usually requires an update to get released through the app store, which typically takes a few weeks.

Publishers not only have to do some development work to make this happen, but they then have to ensure that it doesn’t break the app itself before releasing it and then have to support updates to the SDK, basically forever, since not all users will update their apps, so legacy SDKs will stay in place long after a publisher might remove a vendor’s code from the most current version of the app.

So, with all that headache, the IAB took up the challenge to set some standards for SDK development, creating an open standard for rich media APIs to communicate with a mobile device, which is what an SDK does. By standardizing the API code, publishers can hopefully move to an SDK agnostic place, where they can use one centralized SDK that works with all rich media, and not need to support multiple piece of vendor code to enable ads. This is a big deal for the Ad Ops community and the Ad Tech community, who have struggled under the weight of technical problems to get campaigns live and facilitate mobile ad budgets. Hopefully MRAID makes a huge dent in those operational problems, and makes it faster and easier to get campaigns up and running, which should encourage advertisers to put more money to work in mobile.

I would encourage all Ops professionals to demand MRAID compliant apps and ads in your mobile ad spec and with vendor negotiations. The good news is that MRAID has enjoyed wide adoption and compliance from the major players in the mobile marketplace from the beginning, so there is already considerable momentum here.

Read about the other most significant developments in Ad Ops in 2011:

MediaBank & Donovan Data Systems Merger
Adobe Emerged as a Major Force in Ad Tech